Original Families of
Germanna,
Virginia Colony
April, 1714
The Memorial Foundation
of the Germanna Colonies in Virginia, Inc.
Germantown,
Virginia
1714

The Hittson Project
German Surnames
Americanized
Origins
Siegerland
Fathers
Mothers
Husbands
Wives
Children
Albrecht
Albrecht
Switzerland
  Johann Juste Albrecht
 
Bach
Back
       
Brombach
Brumback
Musen
  Melchior Brombach
Maria Elizabeth Fischbach
 
Button
Button
       
Coons-Kuntz
Coons-Koontz
Niederndorf
Jost Cuntze
Anna Gertrud Reinschmidt
  Johannes
Anna Elizabeth
Catherina
Fischbach
Fishback
Trupbach
Philip Fischbach
Elizabeth Heimbach
  Johannes
Harman
Maria Elizabeth
Haeger
Friesenhagen
Haeger
Oberfischbach
  Rev. Henry Haeger
Anna Catherine Friesenhagan
Agnes
Anna Catherine
Heite
Hitt
Rehbach and
Kaan-
Marienborn
  Peter Heite
Maria Elizabeth
 
Holzklau
Holtsclaw
Oberfischbach
Hans Jacob Holtclaw
Anna Margaretha Otterbach
  Johannes
Johann Henrich
Huffman
Hofmann
Eisern
  Johannes Huffman
 
Kemper
Kemper
Musen
  Johannes Kemper
 
Merten
Martin
Musen
Johann Jost / John Joseph
   
Mueller
Miller
       
Noeh
Nay
       
Richter
Rector
Trupbach
Hans Jacob Richter
Anna Elisabeth Fischbach
  Johannes
Spielmann
Spilman
       
Otterbach
Utterbach
Trupbach
Herman Otterbach
Elizabeth Heimbach
  Johann Philip
Johannes
Elizabeth
Alice Catherine
Mary Catherine
Anna Catherine
Weidmann
Wayman
       
Weber
Weaver
Eisern
Johann Henrich Weber
Anna Margarethe Huttman
  Johannes
Cathrin
Tillman
Weissgerber
Whitescarver
       
Jung
Young
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
Late Spring 1713
People left Nassau-Siegen
Summer 1713
People arrived in London; committed
to four years of service
January 1714
People left England for Virginia on
an unknown ship
Late March 1714
Spotswood first learns that Germans
are coming from Col Nathaniel
Blakiston, agent for Virginia in
London
April 1714
Germans arrive in Virginia
1716
People start mining operations at the
silver mine
1718
People instructed to search for iron
  The search for iron continued at
mining and quarrying.  People
committed to buy land at
"Germantown."  By December 1718,
Spotswood says he spent 60
pounds, so there was not yet an iron
furnace.
January 1719
People moved to Germantown.  Four
years of service completed
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Prologue
THE PLACE WAS something out of a fairy tale, a ghost town in the
wilderness, empty houses lining the street on one side, savage plants
creeping toward them to recover their domain, and on the other
side—an enchanted castle, where a gentleman lived with his wife and
her young sister. They might have been king, queen, and princess,
and the two tame deer which wandered about the house were
doubtless a lord and lady transformed by some magic into their
present shape. There was a rich meadow, surrounded on three sides
by a winding river, and shady lanes which led past a marble fountain,
and a covered bower where the princess satand bewailed the suitor
who did not come.

This was Germanna, on the Rapidan River in Spotsylvania; the king
was Colonel Alexander Spotswood, former Governor of Virginia, and
the queen was the wife whom he had brought from London to live in
this improbable paradise. The empty houses had once been the
homes of the German settlers whom Spotswood had planted there
but who had since deserted him.

In September,1732, the place was visited by a traveller who, like the
Spotswoods, would have looked more at home on Regent Street
than on the frontier of Virginia. William Byrd had come to consult with
the Colonel about iron-mining,but he had a gift for recording scenes
and conversations, and in his journal he snatched the whole episode
out of time and left it to us, complete with Spotswood’s oracular
pronouncements not only on iron-mining, but also on tar-burning,
hemp, the Spaniards, the post office, and British politics. In this
fantastic setting, so far from the civilized world, far it might seem from
the world at all . . .

Spotswood’s prophecy need not be ascribed to second sight, for he
had been Governor of Virginia, and he knew from bitter experience
how jealously a colonial assembly guarded its right to levy taxes.

In 1715 the House of Burgesses had refused to grant the supplies
necessary for defense against the Indians, because they thought that
he had called some of their prerogatives in question. He had
denounced them and finally dissolved them, but he had not beaten
them. And he knew that any attempt by Parliament to beat them
would have met with doubled resistance.